Narrow Road to the Interior

My journey into the wide
world and flying the
nest that some call home.


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Reblogged from psych-facts
We assume others show love the same way we do — and if they don’t, we worry it’s not there.

(via paulwes)

Everyone has their own love language. That’s one of the most important lessons I’ve ever learned.

(via pleasedontcallmelhead)

(Source: psych-facts, via knitmecrazy)

Reblogged from soocosmopolitan
tamorapierce:

kateelliottsff:

knitmeapony:


Rebel With a Cause


Keen to continue her studies abroad, Hayat Sindi told her father some good news: She had been accepted at a prestigious university in London. Her traditional Muslim father said it would tarnish the family name for a young woman to live overseas alone. “He told me, ‘Over my dead body,’” Sindi recalls. Still, she persuaded him, and off she went to England.


The truth is, she hadn’t been accepted at any university. When she landed in London as a teenager in 1991, she says, she spoke only Arabic, no English. “My first night there, I went to a youth hostel,” she says. “I was in an attic room. I panicked. I looked at my plane tickets—my father had bought a return ticket. I thought, I’ll go home tomorrow.” Instead she went to an Islamic cultural center and got a translator to help her meet with college officials. “They told me, ‘You’re crazy,’” she says. “I was naive. I thought they would just let me in.”


After a year spent cramming on English and studying to pass the “A-levels,” the U.K.’s college-admission courses, she got herself in to King’s College, where she graduated in 1995 with a degree in pharmacology. She went on to get a Ph.D. in biotechnology from Cambridge in 2001. She says her family didn’t learn about her lie until years later, when they were surprised to hear her mention it in a speech.
“My father was worried that, when I lived abroad alone, I would ruin the family honor,” she says. But in time he boasted to the neighbors, like any proud father. “When he died,” she says, “I found newspaper clippings about me under his pillow.” 
Sindi is known in scientific circles for her “social innovation,” as she calls it, such as co-founding a group at Harvard to develop a new technique for using tiny, cheap slips of paper and a drop of blood or saliva to diagnose liver disease, and perhaps eventually AIDS—potentially replacing costly lab tests. The technology, while still being tested, has the potential to save lives across the developing world.



amazing. simply inspiring.


Boss.

Wow.

Womanpride.

tamorapierce:

kateelliottsff:

knitmeapony:

Rebel With a Cause

Keen to continue her studies abroad, Hayat Sindi told her father some good news: She had been accepted at a prestigious university in London. Her traditional Muslim father said it would tarnish the family name for a young woman to live overseas alone. “He told me, ‘Over my dead body,’” Sindi recalls. Still, she persuaded him, and off she went to England.

The truth is, she hadn’t been accepted at any university. When she landed in London as a teenager in 1991, she says, she spoke only Arabic, no English. “My first night there, I went to a youth hostel,” she says. “I was in an attic room. I panicked. I looked at my plane tickets—my father had bought a return ticket. I thought, I’ll go home tomorrow.” Instead she went to an Islamic cultural center and got a translator to help her meet with college officials. “They told me, ‘You’re crazy,’” she says. “I was naive. I thought they would just let me in.”

After a year spent cramming on English and studying to pass the “A-levels,” the U.K.’s college-admission courses, she got herself in to King’s College, where she graduated in 1995 with a degree in pharmacology. She went on to get a Ph.D. in biotechnology from Cambridge in 2001. She says her family didn’t learn about her lie until years later, when they were surprised to hear her mention it in a speech.

“My father was worried that, when I lived abroad alone, I would ruin the family honor,” she says. But in time he boasted to the neighbors, like any proud father. “When he died,” she says, “I found newspaper clippings about me under his pillow.” 

Sindi is known in scientific circles for her “social innovation,” as she calls it, such as co-founding a group at Harvard to develop a new technique for using tiny, cheap slips of paper and a drop of blood or saliva to diagnose liver disease, and perhaps eventually AIDS—potentially replacing costly lab tests. The technology, while still being tested, has the potential to save lives across the developing world.

amazing. simply inspiring.

Boss.

Wow.

Womanpride.

(via tamikaflynned)

Reblogged from danswildlife

Have you ever seen a peacock in full flight?

brainbubblegum:

morrissarty:

wildanimalwildperson:

I do not own these pics. They were sent to me in an email. But I thought I’d share with you all because they’re just AMAZING.

image

image

image

image

image

DRAGONS

I feel so stupid I didn’t know they could fly, I thought they were like CHICKENS, I never questioned it because these pictures never circulate, I am WAY OVER MY HEAD.

(Source: danswildlife, via allthefandomsbby)

Reblogged from petitelionwrites

Why your character’s religion (or lack of) is important:

petitelionwrites:

Anyone in the roleplay community who knows me knows i am one hundred percent about one specific thing: religions. It pains me to see people only use religion when they are playing “religion freaks”. That term roughly translates to someone who’s obsessed with religion and takes everything about a certain religion to heart. While these people do exist, it is more likely that you’ll see people who embrace only certain parts of a religion but religion does surround us on a day to day basis and if you want a realistic character or roleplay in general, you must take them into consideration. Stop being afraid of religions. 

RELIGION AND EDUCATION: 

  • If your roleplay is set in the United States of America then one of the first things that must come to mind is saying the pledge in the morning. “One nation, under God.” There are several ways people take the pledge: those who don’t pay much attention but say it anyway, those who say the pledge but emit the “God” part, and those who don’t say the pledge at all. Another thing you might want to consider is Catholic schools or any type of educational institution that takes religion into great consideration. It’s becoming rather tacky to see every single Catholic school girl hate religion in general, while yes, there is many Catholic school girls who hate their school simply because of how it is formatted, it doesn’t mean every single one of them is going to start hailing Satan. 
  • Another point, believing in Satan or some sort of underworld in general is a part of almost every single religion. While some may think of religions in general a simply a spiritual path towards heaven, hell is about 50% of religions. Why else would people be so intent on being good and getting into heaven? Because there’s the possibility of getting into hell. 
  • One last thing to consider regarding religions and education is the education of religions. You learn about religions in history class, in philosophy class, and in well, religion class if you attend a school/university that offers it. When talking about religion in a history class you only learn the basics because teachers aren’t allowed or have the time to go into depth with every single piece of a religion, religions are huge and complicated especially if you’re solely talking about the major ones (Islam, Christianity, Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism). In philosophy class you’re taught more in depth about religions but still not 100% and when you take a philosophy class or a history class you’re not necessarily taking either to learn about religions but to learn about every subject offered in the class. However, when you take a specific religious class it has to be because you’re interested in the religion or the religion is yours. 

RELIGION AND EATING: 

  • Buddhism: In Theravada and Mahayana schools many people do not eat meat or fish. Some are vegans and specifically in China and Vietnam, many do not eat onions or garlic. Buddha told people not to eat certain types of meats: humans, elephants, horses, dogs, snakes, lions, tigers, boars, and hyenas. This was due to self-respect and protection. Though there is no specific law in Buddhism regarding food, in the time of the Buddha himself, monks were expected to eat everything put in their begging bowl without discrimination. 
  • Hinduism: In this religion, meat, fish, poultry, and eggs are forbidden. People who follow this religion very closely also don’t eat garlic, onions, mushrooms, alcohol, and tea or coffee. In the Vedic texts, one should offer food as a sacrifice to God. Many references indicate that fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, and dairy products are fit for humans to consume. The food offered to God is thought to bestow religious merit, purify the body, mind, and spirit. For this reason food has a close relation not only to the religion as a whole but in worship. The forbidden foods are considered ignorant and beef in particular is avoided due to respect for the cow. Bhishma, central character in a Hindu epic tells about how no sacrifice should be made without butter. Therefore, cows became essential. 
  • Christianity: Most Christians do not have a restriction when it come to eating meat though they refrain from eating it on Fridays or during Lent. There are only two biblical references regarding food: Genesis 9.1-4 and Genesis 1.29. The first allow people to eat meat under certain circumstances and the second states that vegetarianism was God’s original will. Most Christians will eat anywhere and don’t experience as many food restrictions as other religions. 
  • Judaism: The ingredients forbidden in the Jewish religion are several: emulsifiers of animal origin, glycerin, gelatin, shellfish, and prawns. Kashrut is the system of Jewish dietary laws. The Torah does not specify any reason for dietary laws but they are followed in order to show obedience to God. Leviticus 11:3 states, “Whatsoever parteth the hoof, and is clovenfooted, and cheweth the cud, among the beasts, that shall ye eat.” 
  • Islam: Ingredients forbidden include pork, gelatin, meat not slaughtered in the prescribed way, blood, alcohol, carnivorous animals, and lard. Eating is a matter of faith, their dietary practices are also essentially about obeying God. You must recite the name of God (Allah) before eating and thank God after you are done. It is important to eat by the right hand in company and the name of Allah must be pronounced while slaughtering. It is also important to only eat when you are hungry and not to eat in excess. Essentially it is about thanking Allah for everything and keeping in mind that he is to thank for meals. 

RELIGION AND HOBBIES: 

CONCLUSION: 

  • Evidently, I don’t know everything about every religion and this was very generic and basic. If you’d like more information on a certain religion then please simply let me know. What I wanted to show more than anything, was that religion is such a part of everyday life. You see it in music, poems, television, movies, everywhere. It has even such a great part in dietary habits. It pains me the amount of people I see who are Buddhists and don’t take their dietary habits into consciousness or even their schools or prayers. I’m sorry that the world has decided to create this idea that religions are something to be feared, that they are evil, but they play a huge and essential part of every day life! Don’t play a religious freak, simply be conscious of what you are doing and saying. As always, if you would like to add more to this feel free, any questions contact me, any mistakes let me know. And have fun creating characters! 

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Reblogged from gingerb3ard

gingerb3ard:

In case anyone needs some cheering up at the moment.

(via turtlerika)

Reblogged from rarararambles
If living
is really the greatest revenge
then I want you
to have my laughter.
And if we really do get what we give
then I give up,
so that I can
get up.
Buddy Wakefield (via rarararambles)

(via msfrannyglass)

Reblogged from yifftrolls

yifftrolls:

characters who act absolutely batshit and unpredictable but really know exactly what theyre doing are my 100% tru favorite forever 

(via vonbaghager)

Reblogged from beemill
shuckl:

unclefather:

infinitecringe:

beemill:



via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.
At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.
So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.
As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.
Edit for pictures. http://imgur.com/a/jDKVi




SO CUTE

"my" bees? who the fuck owns bees as a pet

beekeepers

shuckl:

unclefather:

infinitecringe:

beemill:

via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.

At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.

So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.

As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.

SO CUTE

"my" bees? who the fuck owns bees as a pet

beekeepers

(via desu-rocker)

Reblogged from memewhore

(Source: memewhore, via baeddelaire)

Reblogged from gobigorgoextinct

frauleinninja:

lledra:

sharped0:

gobigorgoextinct:

Steve Irwin in a Jaeger would be entertaining.

Look over there. There’s a Catergory 3 Kaiju. Biggest one yet. 

Ah’m gonna wrassle with it. 

#yeah but who’s his drift partner. a crocodile. just a crocodile. its not a special or humanoid croc its literally just a croc strapped in.

image

THIS IS THE THIRD TIME I’VE REBLOGGED THIS BUT I DON’T CARE BECAUSE IT HAS IMPROVED EVERY TIME

(via sashanico)

I met you at a party or on a crowded street
A silent singularity when glances chanced to meet
You looked into my glasses, said you’d seen a ghost
I tried my best to make you smile as we calypsoed close

Leaves and Kings, Josh Ritter

Josh Ritter is preforming in Sun Valley this weekend, so I’m familiarizing myself with his work and… Goddamn it Josh Ritter, stop giving me feelings. NO.

Reblogged from guernicamag
I think most people do not imagine how things can change. In Detroit, there are community gardens that are only an indication that the country is coming back to the city. And that is something that actually is necessary to stop the real imminent danger of the extermination of our planet. When I came to Detroit, if you threw a stone up in the air it would hit an autoworker on its way down. A few years after that, if you threw a stone in the air it’d hit an abandoned house or a vacant lot on its way down. And most people saw those vacant lots as blight. But meanwhile during World War II, blacks had moved from the South to the North. And they saw these vacant lots as places where you could grow food for the community. And so urban agriculture was born. And that came about not because anyone planned it, but because the vacant lots, produced by abandonment, created the opportunity for bringing the country back into the city, and actually saving the planet in the process. Small Rebellions, Michelle Chen interviews Grace Lee Boggs - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via commovente)

Reblogged from girlvswhale

One day, I will outgrow these feelings—bust through the seams of wanting you and break open the bottom of my desire. I know you are nothing like I imagine; your skin isn’t as soft and your mouth isn’t as delicate and your fingers aren’t as strong. Still, until you pass from my system—until I purge you from under my skin—I will fall asleep imagining your hands rising up my torso; the cup of your palms gripping my ribs; your index finger brushing the curve of my breasts as we drift off to sleep.

There are nights where I imagine your shape in the dark; you seem so light, like I could carry you with me for the rest of this life and never truly feel your weight. I know the truth though—I know that things that seem so weightless in the dark are often the heaviest thing in the light

One day, I’ll split open my heart and let you pour out of me, leaving behind a stain neither of us will remember the story behind—just a grease mark that, in the right light, you can’t even see.

Kristen Fiore //  One day, I’ll fall in love without you.  (via girlvswhale)

(via girlvswhale)

Reblogged from stunningpicture
stunningpicture:

Kids work together to create eternal recess

stunningpicture:

Kids work together to create eternal recess

(via tamikaflynned)

Reblogged from knittingcountess

knittingcountess:

My “Rustling Leaves Beret" has been blocked (blocked version on right).  The unblocked version is on the left shows the truer color ("Wasabi," a green that is really more yellow!).

(via knitmecrazy)